“I Wish I Had Been in the Case”: Portrait Photography, Federal Soldiers, and the Home Circle – Part I

by James Brookes

Today the Emerging Civil War Blog published the first part of an article I wrote on the importance of portrait photography in establishing a connection between the separated military and domestic spheres for Federal soldiers during the Civil War. Using letters, diaries, post-war memoirs, novels and journals, it establishes the photographic portrait as a significant item in the soldier’s inventory and in the home of the family he departed from. Please click here to view the article.

anonymous, 'Unidentified soldier in Union uniform with Colt revolver and Sheffield side knife', 1861-1865, ninth-plate tintype, hand-coloured, Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs (Library of Congress), http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/ppmsca.33328/?co=lilj

anonymous, ‘Unidentified soldier in Union uniform with Colt revolver and Sheffield side knife’, 1861-1865, ninth-plate tintype, hand-coloured, Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs (Library of Congress), http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/ppmsca.33328/?co=lilj

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